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    1. Timothy Smith
      5 Stars Out Of 5
      December 14, 2009
      Timothy Smith
      A great book showing how churches have strayed from holding to the full Gospel - Makes one think about how Biblical is my life, my understanding of God. Do we really call sin - sin? OR are we making excuses for our and others' conduct?A must read for those who are serious about serving and living for God.
    2. Christy Lockstein
      3 Stars Out Of 5
      June 18, 2009
      Christy Lockstein
      The Disappearance of God by R. Albert Mohler Jr is a stark look at how the church has been transforming into the image of popular culture instead of the other way around. Mohler tackles some tough issues like the emerging church, discipline within the church, and moral relativism. The book has some terrific points, but it felt much like a college lecture. I wanted Mohler to start speaking in layman's terms and create more of a conversation than a lecture. If you can wade through the high language, you'll find some excellent arguments about how the church is failing its people and vice versa. I learned a great deal about the emergent church and how church discipline is supposed to work. I am concerned with how Mohler is addressing this topic however. I think that a lot of older members of the church will love this book and it will be preaching to the choir. However, the younger members of the church do want a more loving, compassionate church. Generations X and Y tend to communicate in a different way than previous generations, and while that doesn't excuse forgetting about the core of what Christianity is about: Christ's divinity and the Trinity, the church does need to find a new way to speak so those members will listen and want to be a part of it. Mohler's church seems to exclude them and want to discipline them right out the door.
    3. Sandra Hill
      5 Stars Out Of 5
      June 7, 2009
      Sandra Hill
      This book is a real eye-opener. It alerted me to all the changes going on even in the "evangelical" world that are undermining "those doctrines most central and essential to the Christian faith." The absence of sin, hell and a redefining of the sovereignty of God are just a few of the subjects Dr. Mohler discusses in this book. The chapters on "Darkness at Noon" were especially meaningful to me as he deals with the subject of compliance by the church. He says "The entire biblical truth-claim is under assault in today's culture. We see the tightening grip of tenacity of all this onslaught. We see a culture that increasingly loves darkness rather than light. We can see the logic of the culture, and we can see that the church has beeen compliant too long." This book calls us to be alert and discerning in a world where God is most definitely disappearing.
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