The Contested Public Square: The Crisis of Christianity and Politics  -     By: Greg Forster
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The Contested Public Square: The Crisis of Christianity and Politics

IVP Academic / 2008 / Paperback

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Product Description

Greg Foster's work is a fascinating look at the development of Christian political thought. Tracing the often harrowing relationship between Christians, Scripture, and governments, Forster examines the persecution of the first-century church and its effect on political identity; Augustine's concept of "dual citizenship"; the Enlightenment and the duty of toleration; the crisis of totalitarianism in the 20th century. This is an excellent guide to the history of Christian political thought from biblical times, through the Greco-Roman world, and throughout the rise of Western culture.

Product Information

Format: Paperback
Number of Pages: 280
Vendor: IVP Academic
Publication Date: 2008
Dimensions: 9.00 X 6.00 (inches)
ISBN: 083082880X
ISBN-13: 9780830828807
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Publisher's Description

Christian thinking about involvement in human government was not born (or born again!) with the latest elections or with the founding of the Moral Majority in 1979. The history of Christian political thinking goes back to the first decades of the church's existence under persecution. Building on biblical foundations, that thinking has developed over time. This book introduces the history of Christian political thought traced out in Western culture--a culture experiencing the dissolution of a long-fought-for consensus around natural law theory. Understanding our current crisis, where there is little agreement and often opposing views about how to maintain both religious freedom and liberal democracy, requires exploring how we got where we are. Greg Forster tells that backstory with deft discernment and clear insight. He offers this retrospective not only to inform but also to point the way beyond the current impasse in the contested public square. Illuminated by sidebars on key moments in history, major figures and questions for further consideration, this book will significantly inform Christian scholars' and students' reading and interpretation of history.

Author Bio

Greg Forster (Ph.D., Yale University) is director of the Program in American History, Economics & Religion in the Kern Family Foundation. He is the author of (InterVarsity Press) and (Cambridge University Press). He has also contributed to the leading scholarly journals and , and his articles have appeared in the and . He is also a senior fellow at the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice.

Endorsements

"Greg Forster recognizes that political philosophy is older than Christianity and independent of the Old Testament. This fact does not deny that both Testaments have something to say about politics. He has avoided the temptation of trying to explain the Christian tradition as if it began in the twentieth century, or even in the sixteenth. The very existence of revelation as its own coherent whole implies that the public square at some points should be 'contested,' even for it to be itself. In the beginning, he cites C. S. Lewis's coy devil to warn us that 'social justice' can well be our first step away from God. That step is a very current temptation that defines in large part the real 'crisis' that Forster sees in the public square. The book is well worth a careful read." —James V. Schall, S.J., professor, Department of Government, Georgetown University

"This is a learned and lucid exploration of the origins, development and contemporary state of the political ideas of natural law, church and state, and religious toleration. To understand how the public square became what it is today, Forster's book follows the twists and turns in the triumphs and disappointments of these political ideas in Western civilization. By concentrating on certain Christian themes and thinkers in a sweeping historical analysis, Forster's The Contested Public Square provides a much-needed correction for the introductory study of Western political theory." —Lee Trepanier, associate professor, Saginaw Valley State University

"This book is an astonishing achievement. With a mastery of the historical material and a keen appreciation of the changing forms of the problem through the centuries, Dr. Forster illuminates for Christians and others the present crisis of public virtue and just government." —Richard John Neuhaus, editor-in-chief, First Things

"This is a good introduction to the history of Christian political thought---and not just for evangelical readers. In the author's own words: 'I could not explain Madison without explaining Luther; I could not explain Luther without explaining Aquinas; and I could not explain Aquinas without explaining Augustine, Peter, Paul, Aristotle and Plato.' Well-done!" —Michael Novak, author of On Two Wings: Humble Faith and Common Sense at the American Founding

"The Contested Public Square is a comprehensive and readable history of Western political thought that gives particular attention to the influence of Christianity. A major theme is the importance of natural law for the development of ideas of religious freedom, constitutionalism and human rights. Students and teachers of political theory will be particularly interested in Professor Forster's controversial but convincing argument that Augustine, William of Ockham, Luther and Calvin were natural law thinkers." —Paul E. Sigmund, professor of politics, Princeton University

"A quarter-century after Richard John Neuhaus's Naked Public Square, Greg Forster has given readers a guide in The Contested Public Square: The Crisis of Christianity and Politics. Like Neuhaus, Forster has documented the decline of natural law thinking. But beyond that declension, Forster offers an ambitious survey of the rise of Christian political thought from its inception some two millennia ago to its present 'crisis.'" —Jeffry H. Morrison, associate professor of government, Regent University

Author Bio

Greg Forster (Ph.D., Yale University) is director of the Program in American History, Economics & Religion in the Kern Family Foundation. He is the author of John Locke's Politics of Moral Consensus, and has contributed to many leading scholarly journals. In addition, his articles have appeared in more popular venues such as the Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, and Philadelphia Inquirer. He is a senior fellow at the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice.

Publisher Description

Christian thinking about involvement in human government was not born (or born again!) with the latest elections or with the founding of the Moral Majority in 1979. The history of Christian political thinking goes back to the first decades of the church's existence under persecution. Building on biblical foundations, that thinking has developed over time.

This book introduces the history of Christian political thought traced out in Western culture---a culture experiencing the dissolution of a long-fought-for consensus around natural law theory. Understanding our current crisis, where there is little agreement and often opposing views about how to maintain both religious freedom and liberal democracy, requires exploring how we got where we are. Greg Forster tells that backstory with deft discernment and clear insight. He offers this retrospective not only to inform but also to point the way beyond the current impasse in the contested public square.

Illuminated by sidebars on key moments in history, major figures and questions for further consideration, this book will significantly inform Christian scholars' and students' reading and interpretation of history.

Publisher's Weekly

While many assume that the question of Christian involvement in politics is a recent one, this work traces the 2,000-year history of Christian thinking on the place of religion and politics—“the story of how we got to where we are now”—a philosophical tradition going back to the ancient Greeks. Christian scholar Forster locates the origins of this story in the faith's first three centuries, when believers faced persecution, making the church suspicious of political power. Even after Christianity was established as the religion of the state, this initial experience with persecution continued to influence Christian thinking about the relationship between the church and political institutions. Forster offers an intellectual history that is learned and accessible, and he fills his account with the lives and works of some of Christianity's most important thinkers, from Augustine and Aquinas through Luther and Locke to Reinhold Niebuhr and C.S. Lewis. Most helpful is the clear account Forster gives of natural law theory and its influence on Christian political thought. Some readers may strain to see the “crisis” that Forster predicts, and others may not share his clearly Christian frame of reference, but this is a work that offers a thorough account of a long and complicated history. (Nov.) Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

Editorial Reviews

"This book is an astonishing achievement. With a mastery of the historical material and a keen appreciation of the changing forms of the problem through the centuries, Dr. Forster illuminates for Christians and others the present crisis of public virtue and just government."
"A quarter-century after Richard John Neuhaus's Naked Public Square, Greg Forster has given readers a guide in The Contested Public Square: The Crisis of Christianity and Politics. Like Neuhaus, Forster has documented the decline of natural law thinking. But beyond that declension, Forster offers an ambitious survey of the rise of Christian political thought from its inception some two millennia ago to its present 'crisis.'"
" The Contested Public Square is a comprehensive and readable history of Western political thought that gives particular attention to the influence of Christianity. A major theme is the importance of natural law for the development of ideas of religious freedom, constitutionalism and human rights. Students and teachers of political theory will be particularly interested in Professor Forster's controversial but convincing argument that Augustine, William of Ockham, Luther and Calvin were natural law thinkers."
"This is a good introduction to the history of Christian political thought--and not just for evangelical readers. In the author's own words: 'I could not explain Madison without explaining Luther; I could not explain Luther without explaining Aquinas; and I could not explain Aquinas without explaining Augustine, Peter, Paul, Aristotle and Plato.' Well-done!"
"This is a learned and lucid exploration of the origins, development and contemporary state of the political ideas of natural law, church and state, and religious toleration. To understand how the public square became what it is today, Forster's book follows the twists and turns in the triumphs and disappointments of these political ideas in Western civilization. By concentrating on certain Christian themes and thinkers in a sweeping historical analysis, Forster's The Contested Public Square provides a much-needed correction for the introductory study of Western political theory."
"Greg Forster recognizes that political philosophy is older than Christianity and independent of the Old Testament. This fact does not deny that both Testaments have something to say about politics. He has avoided the temptation of trying to explain the Christian tradition as if it began in the twentieth century, or even in the sixteenth. The very existence of revelation as its own coherent whole implies that the public square at some points should be 'contested,' even for it to be itself. In the beginning, he cites C. S. Lewis's coy devil to warn us that 'social justice' can well be our first step away from God. That step is a very current temptation that defines in large part the real 'crisis' that Forster sees in the public square. The book is well worth a careful read."

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