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  1. All Things Hidden - eBookeBOOK
    All Things Hidden - eBook
    Tracie Peterson, Kimberley Woodhouse
    Bethany House / 2014 / ePub
    $9.69 Retail: $14.99 Save 35% ($5.30)
    4.5 Stars Out Of 5 24 Reviews
    Availability: In Stock
    CBD Stock No: WW42612EB
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  1. Iowa
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Excellent Historical Christian Read
    February 16, 2014
    Sara
    Iowa
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This review was written for All Things Hidden.
    This book is set in Alaska in 1935. The story is about a father and daughter that work together to take care of people as a doctor and nurse team. Life on the Alaskan frontier is not easy for Harold Hillerman and his daughter, Gwyn. Despite the obvious difficulties, Gwyn and her father have made a life for themselves and enjoy the beauty of nature and the native people of Alaska.

    With the Depression in the states, the government has decided to help some young families relocate and begin a new life in Alaska. With the promise of help to build houses, transportation to get there, and the start of a better life, a number of families begin the journey.

    Dr. Harold is concerned about the large amount of people that will be coming to Alaska, and the great chance for disease and not enough help. He sends a message to a young doctor he mentored as a child in hopes that maybe he might be looking for a challenge. Dr Jeremiah Vaughan receives this request at a time in his life when things are not looking very promising. After working and giving his all to his career in Chicago, he finds himself with the treat of his medical license being threatened. This move to Alaska might be just the reprieve he needs.

    Dr. Vaughan, Dr Hillerman, and Gwyn work together to do their best to help all the people that are arriving in Alaska. Through measles, TB, and many other health issues that are faced in the building of this new community, the work keeps the 3 very busy.

    Gwyn loves to be outside in the garden and has learned many ways to help survive the Alaskan winters and is eager to help those arriving to succeed in this new venture.

    This book is filled with struggles of a single young woman adjusting to many changes in her world. There is also a little mystery, and many adventures. I enjoyed reading this book, and would strongly recommend it to others. The intertwining of faith and adventures of the Alaskan frontier keep the reader turning the next page to find out what happens next.

    I received a complimentary copy of this book in return for my honest opinion. The opinions shared in this review are soley my responsibility.
  2. Age: 18-24
    Gender: female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    From the cover on in... just beautiful.
    February 13, 2014
    Sufficient in Jesus
    Age: 18-24
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This review was written for All Things Hidden.
    First, I want to say that the cover on All Things Hidden is the most beautiful I have seen this year.

    The whole look of it... the lone girl in her nurse's uniform with the golden-lit mountains rising behind her and the wind whipped grasses all around her.

    There are two other views of the girl on the back and cover spine as well. On the back she is standing near a clump of Queen Anne's lace, with the ever-present mountains in the distance, and she's staring off contemplatively. On the spine her face is downcast as if she's somber.

    I love that. Those photos capture the personality of Gwyn Hillerman oh so well. She is sunny and outdoorsy, skilled in nursing and loyal with those she trusts, yet she's also a lover of space and silence.

    And thereby hangs the tale, because the peace Gwyn had found in her Alaskan village was about to be invaded by 200 new families.

    Gwyn and her father didn't have a perfect life. How could they, when Gwyn's mother and sister had left them years before to return to the continental United States? What they had was a steady life, her and Dr. Hillerman. He was the lone doctor and she was his right hand girl. They treated all patients that needed them, and had friends who were like family. Gwyn had a second mother in Nasnana and an adopted sister in Sadzi, and she was content.

    The urgent board meeting that begins this book changes Gwyn's world all at once.

    The government is sponsoring the Depression-motivated idea of sending colonists to Alaska, and the medical needs will likely overwhelm the small clinic. Dr. Hillerman writes to a friend who is an up-and-coming Chicago doctor and beseeches him to come to their aid and start a practice in Alaska, and soon that man is an integral part of Gwyn's days. Through it all she must continue to work through her hurt over her mother's abandonment and ongoing deceptions about why she left them.

    Thank you Tracie and Kimberly for this pioneering story set in a land of legendary beauty, about a girl who would be delightful to know.

    The ending... whoa, that is a shocker, but no spoilers! The plot tension that began building made me want to keep reading.

    Plus, we discovered a great new expression to add to our family lexicon: "I don't believe in seeing roses where turnips are."
  3. Roxboro, NC
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    Great story of the Alaskan Frontier!
    February 12, 2014
    Lehrerin
    Roxboro, NC
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 4
    Meets Expectations: 4
    This review was written for All Things Hidden.
    All Things Hidden is a most unusual Depression-era story with a very unique twist: the settlement of Alaska. I didn't know that the poor national economy spawned a huge government movement to shift people to the territory of Alaska, so the very premise was exciting. Since the reality of Alaska as our final national frontier is of a rustic, dangerous place, the setting screamed 'new' and 'different.'

    I really liked as a leading lady. She was both humble and hardworking but human, too. She wanted to fall in love and have a family, all the while struggling with the one that she was born into. She's pulled in too many directions, like far too many of us, and she could be the girl next door.

    The action sped up throughout the story. In the beginning you learn primarily about what will happen, at least according to government agents, but as time progresses the plan's problems begin to arise. With Gwyn and her father being the primary troubleshooters in the new Alaskan settlement, they're on the front lines of action - and that continues as stalkers, murder, and general mayhem ensue. This makes for a dramatic and page-turning read, and after a chapter or two, I couldn't put it down.

    I've never read a Peterson novel that I didn't like, and All Things Hidden didn't disappoint. If you're a Peterson fan, this is a must-read.

    I received a free copy of All Things Hidden from Bethany House Publishers in exchange for an honest review.
  4. Age: 25-34
    Gender: female
    4 Stars Out Of 5
    And enjoyable look into Alaska's history.
    February 12, 2014
    Kate
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This review was written for All Things Hidden.
    All Things Hidden was such a wonderful story to get swept up into. Tracie Peterson and Kimberley Woodhouse takes us back to Alaska when the US was wanting to settle this new territory. Unlike previous books by Tracie Peterson that she has set in Alaska, this story takes place not in the 1800's or early 1900's with the gold rush, but during the darkest part of the Depression. FDR has implemented the New Deal and the push to get people working and into a fresh start has begun.

    The characters of this story were created well. With Gwyn, I could understand her and was able to connect with her and desire to want things stay the same. I enjoyed that this book took place over many months and showed the progress between Gwyn and Jeremiah was a slow progression. Jeremiah, I thought had a tougher climb to understanding, but his growth was good. It also showed through these characters, that even though things happened in the past, it is sometimes hard to let them go, which is all too true. Jeremiah and Gwyn were very real with the emotions and feelings they had.

    Tracie Peterson has also brought the beauty of Alaska alive again with this story. The details and descriptions to scenery were wonderful and could easily be seen as I read through this story. The portrayals of the dangers of this land were also shown an understandable way. Alaska is America's last frontier and offers such a wide canvas to work with for stories.

    The only small negative to the story was how quickly the extra characters came and went from the story. We were introduced to a few, they served their small purpose and you didn't hear from them again. I guess I would have liked to have heard their reaction to a part or two. That was the only thing that caught my attention.

    I enjoyed looking back to a time in history that isn't widely known about. I enjoyed reading the historical details. I find it interesting how back in the 1930's the US was trying to settle Alaska and to this day are still trying, at least back in 2008/2009, they were looking for a few more families for a new area.

    Thank you to Bethany House, I received a copy of this book for free in exchange for an honest review.
  5. Colorado
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    An Accurate Portrayal
    February 7, 2014
    Noreen
    Colorado
    Age: 55-65
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This review was written for All Things Hidden.
    The story is historical fiction, with some suspense, set in Matanuska Valley in 1935 during President Roosevelt's Alaska Rural Rehabilitation, when 200 families are given land to settle this rural area. Dr. Hillerman and his daughter Gwyn are the areas only medical personal and Gwyn loves the quiet and simplicity of their lives. Big changes are coming with the influx of people, including a young doctor from Chicago who knows Dr. Hillerman. Dr. Jeremiah Vaughan has lost all that he built his life around, including his medical license. Gwyn is anxious and worried about the changes ahead. A new hospital and more medical staff, will it be a good thing for their area?

    I loved that this story showed the difficulties of homesteading and the prejudice against the native Alaskans. There are twists and turns in the plot, including murder. It was a quick read and held my attention.

    I would rate this book 5 Stars.

    I would like to thank Bethany House, a division of Baker Publishing, for their book review program. I received this book for my honest review and did not receive compensation.
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