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  1. Adventures in Odyssey The Imagination Station ® #3: Peril in the Palace
    Adventures in Odyssey The Imagination Station ® #3: Peril in the Palace
    Marianne Hering, Paul McCusker
    Tyndale House / 2011 / Trade Paperback
    $4.49 Retail: $4.99 Save 10% ($0.50)
    4.5 Stars Out Of 5 31 Reviews
    Availability: In Stock
    CBD Stock No: WW976290
4.5 Stars Out Of 5
4.5 out of 5
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Quality:
4.6 out Of 5
(4.6 out of 5)
Value:
4.6 out Of 5
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Meets Expectations:
4.5 out Of 5
(4.5 out of 5)
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  1. Age: 25-34
    Gender: female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    June 23, 2014
    thecraftyhome
    Age: 25-34
    Gender: female
    Peril in the Palace is the third in the Imagination Station Series. This is a great series for kids ages 7 and up. They are a great alternative to the Magic Tree House books. I love that we can do a whole study off of them in school. My son recently read this book and here is his synopsis.

    .Patrick and Beth meet Mr. Whitaker in the workshop at Whit's End. Mr. Whitaker tells them they have another adventure to do. They get into the Imagination Station and push the red button. They find themselves in China. They turn around and see a bunch of horses riding toward them. The men see them and make the horses run faster. They pick up Beth and Patrick. They go on a long ride to the Wall of China. They go to the other side of the Wall of China. Then they meet Marco Pollo. Marco Pollo bring Patrick and Beth to his tent. Marco Pollo calls his Grandpa and Father. They tell them they have to go to the Emperor. They bow to him. The Emperor says, "arise.: Marco Pollo, his Father and Grandpa, and Patrick and Beth give the Emperor presents. A bunch of men come out that the Emperor calls "lambs." Then the lambs put a pitcher on a stool, the men raise their hands, the pitchers goes up in the air. Then they put a cup on the stool and the pitcher pours wine in the cup. Beth tells Patrick, "I think they are using magnets under their sleeves." Then the Emperor says, "What are magnets?" The lambs pulled up their sleeves. Patrick and Beth saw magnets on their arms. The lambs put Patrick and Beth in a locked room. The young woman says she is a Princess. Patrick and Beth looked in a bag that Mr. Whitaker gave them. In the bag there was a present. They asked the Princess if she could read it because it was in a different language. She could. She opens it and sees a Bible. The Princess says, "It's written my language." (the Bible) Patrick and Beth escape. They see a humongous bird, bigger than them. Then the humongous birds pick them up and bring them to their nest on a cliff called The Rocks. They see a man running toward them. The baby birds in the nest try to bite Patrick and Beth but the man hurts the baby birds before they bite them. Then Beth and Patrick see the Imagination Station and go back to Whit's End.

    This book prompted many questions about the Great Wall. We looked up pictures and learned a little bit about it. I love how naturally learning can come when surrounded with good books to feed the mind. We highly recommend this book and the whole series.
  2. Northern, VA
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    3 Stars Out Of 5
    on giant ROCS and the wrath of Khan
    February 28, 2013
    theTRu
    Northern, VA
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: male
    Quality: 3
    Value: 3
    Meets Expectations: 3
    The adventures continue for cousins Beth and Patrick as they travel through time to help Mr. Whittaker's friend Albert and unravel the mystery of the unknown knight who appears to have equal access to the imagination station. This chapter finds the duo in ancient China in search of a Khan's golden tablet. In the meantime, they're kidnapped by Mongols, introduced to Marco Polo, and threatened by Shaman, Kublai Khan, and giant eagles. How will their gifts help them escape the danger, attain the artifact, and find the Imagination Station to get back home? Well, I don't want to spoil it for you, but I will say, the end of this book is only the beginning...

    Another quick read and enjoyable story for younger readers and fans of Magic Tree House or Secrets of Droon books who are looking for (or at least don't mind) a Christian twist. Note: I've also seen this book under the title "Peril at the Palace" and I believe they are one and the same.
  3. Blairsville,Ga
    Age: Under 18
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    February 25, 2013
    hotwheels
    Blairsville,Ga
    Age: Under 18
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    I thought this was a very good book. I am 8 years old .The book was about 2 kids. These giant eagles try and catch them but people catch them first. At the end the imagination station appears and the kids leave.
  4. Cottonwood, CA
    Age: Under 18
    Gender: female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Epic - A must read
    August 25, 2012
    hannah97
    Cottonwood, CA
    Age: Under 18
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Peril in the Palace by Marianne Hering and Paul McCusker is the third book in the Imagination Station series. The series follows cousins Patrick and Beth in their various adventures in the imagination station. Adventures in Odyssey lover will fall in love with these books. The series is written for younger readers but people of all ages will love the christian values it teaches and enjoy the story.
  5. 2 Stars Out Of 5
    Extra Research Needed
    July 10, 2012
    Thursday4
    Quality: 2
    Value: 3
    Meets Expectations: 3
    Beth and Patrick are in thirteenth century China and are in pursuit of Kublai Khan. In the process they reveal some slight of hand Shamans are using to impress everyone, meet Marco Polo, and deliver a Chinese Bible to Kublai Khan's daughter.

    I had a couple beefs with this book. First, Marco Polo is depicted as writing "The Travels of Marco Polo" as a diary of his travels. This is not the case; Polo dictated his travelogue to Rustichello da Pisa while they were in prison together.

    Second, a mythical bird, the Roc, is depicted as real and plays a crucial part in the storyline. There is no mention of the fact that there is very scant evidence for the existence of this animal outside of Marco Polo's memoir and a mention in Arabian Nights, both of which have doubtful veracity.

    The study of history and foreign cultures should be introduced to children at an early age, and sometimes oversimplifying people and events occurs to make this happen. However, there is a difference between oversimplifying and neglecting to tell the facts.

    I would not recommend that young readers read this by themselves. Some extra adult guidance will be helpful in properly understanding who the historical Kublai Khan and Marco Polo actually were and what they actually did, as well as distinguishing between real and fictional animals.
Displaying items 6-10 of 31
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