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  1. #1: Song of the Ovulum
    #1: Song of the Ovulum
    Bryan Davis
    Living Ink / 2011 / Trade Paperback
    $9.99 Retail: $14.99 Save 33% ($5.00)
    5 Stars Out Of 5 9 Reviews
    Availability: In Stock
    CBD Stock No: WW578804
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  1. 5 Stars Out Of 5
    Great start to the new series
    July 19, 2011
    Levi Wolstrom
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Fifteen years have passed since the happy ending of The Bones of Makaidos. And in those years, the dragons' hopes of peaceful coexistence with humans have vanished. Now, humans who distrust dragons and want to exploit their powers for their own use have captured several anthrozils in the interests of "national security."

    But instead of giving us the story through the eyes of familiar characters, Bryan Davis allows us to see the world afresh, through the thoughts and acts of a new generation. While Billy, Bonnie, and the rest do play a part, most of the action is on Lauren, Matt, and two characters from the dateless past: Joran and Selah, son and daughter of Methuselah.

    Some might call this a risky move. After all, he has spent the past eight books letting us get to know these characters, so why shift all of a sudden? But there is no fear of alienating the reader. Instead, by having the focus on new characters, Song of the Ovulum reads like something new. This is fitting because this story is something new. Yes, it's in the same story universe, but the world is different. I won't give a whole lot away to those who haven't read the book yet, but the happy ending in The Bones of Makaidos isn't so happy a few years later. The world has changed.

    Davis also tries a new model of storytelling that pays off. The story switches back and forth from the near future to events from long ago, told in a way that is both creative and easy to keep track of. I don't want to say what it is, but Bryan Davis does a masterful job of keeping the reader engaged with two distinct story lines that feature the same villain, and without causing any confusion.

    The only negative, if I must call it that, is this: the book isn't all that suitable for newcomers to the series. It assumes the readers are familiar with the previous eight books, even though the characters are new, and some of the flashbacks won't be appreciated by those who have not read the previous books. So for a first-time reader, I would say this: Song of the Ovulum is really book nine in a longer series, and it would be best for them to start with Raising Dragons and experience the adventure from there.
  2. 5 Stars Out Of 5
    Awesome Book!
    July 6, 2011
    Elijah Duval
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    This book is so much different than any of Bryan Davis' other books. It has so much detail and feeling that it makes you feel as if you're experiencing the events with them. The book is about two teenagers, Joran and Selah, children of Methuselah, who survived the flood of Noah by being transported into the purity ovolum before the flood. Trapped inside along with a killer demon who will stop at nothing to get what he wants, they must go on a search to fill their harp with the colors of virtues and discover the key that will release Selah from her captivity. It's also the story of Matt and Lauren, the children of Bonnie and Billy. While they learn of their dragon traits, they must use their newly discovered gifts to rescue their parents along with their friend and their mentor Walter's wife, Ashley. While dragons from second edan, where they are on the brink of war with earth, launch an attack on the government prison that holds them to conduct experiments on them, the evil duo, Mardon and Seramis appear to stop them from escape and to find the Song of the Ovolum.
  3. Bloomer, WI
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Take a journey through time & find the song!
    July 4, 2011
    Blooming with Books
    Bloomer, WI
    Age: 35-44
    Gender: female
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Song of the Ovulum

    is the first book in a new series (Children of the Bard) by Bryan Davis. Though this is a new series it builds on two previous series Dragons in Our Midst and Oracles of Fire. If you have not read the previous two series, read the recap at the end of this book so you will have a basic understanding of preceding events and characters.

    Song of the Ovulum covers two timelines. The first is Joran and Selah's story. Their story picks up the day before the Great Flood that will destroy everyone and everything not aboard Noah's Ark.

    The second story is Matt and Lauren's, who are two 16 year olds with unique abilities. Matt can sense danger and avert disaster before it happens, he also never gets cold. Lauren can hear voices that no one else can hear as they are so quiet (whispers or talking to one's self). Lauren also glows in the dark. What happens when events bring these two together? Are the rumors true? Are Lauren and Matt anthrozils and have their true identities been hidden from them?

    Take a journey through time and other dimensions and learn a lesson in mercy and forgiveness while demons, dragons and humanity battle for Heaven and Earth. Who will be victorious? An exciting page turner you won't want to put down.

    Discover the Song of the Ovulum along with Joran, Selah, Matt and Lauren.
  4. Florida, U.S.
    Age: Under 18
    Gender: male
    5 Stars Out Of 5
    Amazing Addition to a Great Storyworld
    June 24, 2011
    Seth
    Florida, U.S.
    Age: Under 18
    Gender: male
    Quality: 5
    Value: 5
    Meets Expectations: 5
    Song of the Ovulum is the first book in Bryan Davis' new series, Children of the Bard, which builds upon two past series, Dragons in our Midst, and Eye of the Oracle. While it is helpful to read the other two series to get the maximum enjoyment out of this, I believe anyone can enjoy it nonetheless.

    Description:

    Song of the Ovulum follows two main sub-plots that work together to the conclusion. Matt and Lauren are two sixteen-year-olds who begin to realize they have abilities that are unlike those of the normal human as they both find themselves in a strange prison that holds mysterious prisoners. The second plot follows the story of Joran and Selah, the children of Methuselah and grandchildren of Enoch as they travel through fascinating and dangerous lands in hopes to sometime escape the expansive prison they live in.

    For more information on the book, visit the book's web page.

    If you've read my reviews of previous Davis titles then you know that for some reason, I have had past troubles reading the author's books straight through. Something about them typically just makes it difficult to stay in the story continually. I read this book digitally on the computer straight through. It hooked me that much. I very much enjoyed this novel.

    The book starts with a prologue in first person explaining a tragedy that has befallen some of the original anthrozils. It hooks the reader from the very first page and doesn't let up. The tale goes through various points in time and locations. The book references events from past books and can be really rewarding for readers that have read both of the Dragons in our Midst and Oracles of Fire series'. What I thought most interesting is how the world reacts to the dragons, anthrozil's, and Second Eden. The past books have left the world out of what's really going on, but this book engages the rest of the world full on and it was definitely an interesting idea to explore.

    The characters were very fleshed out, and while they kept their perfect characteristics that all of the protagonists of Davis books are known to carry with them, they still maintain their realistic nature. Many might complain about this factor-that they don't mess up-but I think Mr. Davis handles it well and doesn't make the characters seem less real at all. The characters are well developed, attachable, and realistic.

    The writing in the book was outstanding, showing just how much the author knows his craft. P.O.V.'s, while hard to discern sometimes, never switched mid-scene. Description was wonderful and easy to see while also leaving room to the reader's imagination. The writing was done very well.

    The majority of the time is spent in one place, which I found a little irritating. I thought that the location was a little boring at first, but it soon because a set piece for a very nice plot. I look forward to some more varied settings in the future books of the series, but I can definitely see the purpose of the location in this book.

    Overall, I really loved the book. It kept me engaged and wanting to return to read it again and again. The themes are really beautiful-mercy, love, forgiveness, sacrifice-and they are displayed wonderfully. I know at least a few people that will complain about the perfect characters, but it really didn't faze me at all. The characters were well done. I really enjoyed the book and would recommend it to any fan of Mr. Davis' or anyone looking for a nice piece of fiction for the summer. I am highly curious to see what The Children of the Bard series has next.
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